Market Reports

SUPPLY, MEET DEMAND. Multi-Tenant property has had its hay-day since first dropping N of 45% of vacancy from 2020-2021 (14.93% vacancy to 8.38%). With the vacancy rate bottoming out at a record shattering figure of 4.64% in 2022, it appears we may be headed towards stabilization. As any reasonable investor should expect, this sub-sect of the Industrial Market has seen its fair share of renovation and a large amount of spec construction. This race to meet the demand in tandem with a questionable political and economic outlook for the Country has been met with a marginal raise in vacancy to 5.42%. While this figure doesn’t swing the needle to indicate a over-supply in the market, it isn’t something to ignore either. With the Medical Cannabis industry tightening regulations and interest rates rising, this percentage may continue to creep up for a time. Regardless, this market is showing resilience and we believe it will continue to do so.


The multi-family market, more than any other, has been driven by the money funneled into the economy during the course of the pandemic. The shear level of money provided to renters through various pandemic programs combined with the broader economic stimulation led to some of the largest multi-family rent increases in our history. Oklahoma City has historically seen slow but steady rent growth; two to three percent annually. You could always count on it. In 2021, rent increased 12 percent. The increase was cut in half but still historically high in 2022, at 6 percent, with most of this moderation coming in the second half of the year. Clearly this wasn’t sustainable. What isn’t clear is where do we go from here.


Third quarter 2022 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 20.71%, an overall vacancy rate of 22.46%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $19.16 psf. In June, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 4.1%, a decrease of 0.5 percentage points compared to this time last year. In August, U.S. job openings declined to 10.1 million, the lowest since June 2021, while adding 528,000 jobs, more than double economist’s original estimates of 258,000 jobs. In September, the hiring pace slightly declined due to higher rates and slower company growth with 263,000 jobs added and an unemployment rate of 3.5%, a decrease of 1.3 percentage points compared to one year ago. Year to date the Federal Reserve has increased the interest rate five times. The Federal Reserve has announced they will continue to aggressively institute rate increases until inflation declines and are confident that balance among the economy is being restored. Wall Street closed out the month of September down 9.3%, the worst month since March of 2020. Interest rate hikes have taken a toll on the housing market as home prices have decreased at an accelerated rate, long-term mortgage rates increased for 6 straight weeks by the end of September, and a 30-year rate was recorded at 6.7%, the highest in 15 years. Consumers, employers and the overall market remain aware and cautious heading into the fourth quarter as anticipation builds as the year is ready to close out.


Third quarter 2022 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 3.53%, an overall vacancy rate of 3.95%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $6.98 psf. In June, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 4.1%, a decrease of 0.5 percentage points compared to this time last year. In August, U.S. job openings declined to 10.1 million, the lowest since June 2021, while adding 528,000 jobs, more than double economist’s original estimates of 258,000 jobs. In September, the hiring pace slightly declined due to higher rates and slower company growth with 263,000 jobs added and an unemployment rate of 3.5%, a decrease of 1.3 percentage points compared to one year ago. Year to date the Federal Reserve has increased the interest rate five times. The Federal Reserve has announced they will continue to aggressively institute rate increases until inflation declines and are confident that balance among the economy is being restored. Wall Street closed out the month of September down 9.3%, the worst month since March of 2020. Interest rate hikes have taken a toll on the housing market as home prices have decreased at an accelerated rate, long-term mortgage rates increased for 6 straight weeks by the end of September, and a 30-year rate was recorded at 6.7%, the highest in 15 years. Consumers, employers and the overall market remain aware and cautious heading into the fourth quarter as anticipation builds as the year is ready to close out.


First quarter 2022 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 3.9%, an overall vacancy rate of 4.26%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $7.79 psf. In March, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 4.4%, a decrease of 0.7 percentage points compared to this time last year. As the U.S. job market nears full recovery, 431,000 jobs were added in March, the number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits reached a 52-year low, and the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 3.6%, a decrease of 2.4 percentage points compared to one year ago, the lowest rate since the beginning of the pandemic two years ago. However, U.S. inflation has surged to an increase of 7.9% over the past year currently standing at a 40-year high, long-term mortgage rates have risen to the highest they have been since 2019, while producer prices have increased 11.2% compared to one year ago due to higher energy costs leaving consumers around the country to feel the impacts, and U.S. confidence readings fell to the lowest level since 2011. The Federal Reserve announced plans to combat further inflation with increases to the interest rate, which has remained at zero since the beginning of the pandemic. In March, a 0.4% rate increase was issued with an advisory of six additional rate increases throughout 2022 totaling 1.9% and potentially 2.8% by the end of 2023 based on their median forecast, impacting higher loans for consumers and businesses.


First quarter 2022 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 20.59%, an overall vacancy rate of 22.00%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $19.39 psf. In March, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 4.4%, a decrease of 0.7 percentage points compared to this time last year. As the U.S. job market nears full recovery, 431,000 jobs were added in March, the number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits reached a 52-year low, and the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 3.6%, a decrease of 2.4 percentage points compared to one year ago, the lowest rate since the beginning of the pandemic two years ago. However, U.S. inflation has surged to an increase of 7.9% over the past year currently standing at a 40-year high, long-term mortgage rates have risen to the highest they have been since 2019, while producer prices have increased 11.2% compared to one year ago due to higher energy costs leaving consumers around the country to feel the impacts, and U.S. confidence readings fell to the lowest level since 2011. The Federal Reserve announced plans to combat further inflation with increases to the interest rate, which has remained at zero since the beginning of the pandemic. In March, a 0.4% rate increase was issued with an advisory of six additional rate increases throughout 2022 totaling 1.9% and potentially 2.8% by the end of 2023 based on their median forecast, impacting higher loans for consumers and businesses.


Bringing more business activity back to Portland’s urban core will be essential for maintaining the city’s rising apartment profile. With most COVID-19 era restrictions lifted in March, dining, shopping and experiential offerings should draw more residents back to the central part of the city.


On March 12th, 2022, Oregon lifted its statewide mask mandate, marking an end to almost all of the State’s COVID-19 era business restrictions. As a result, retail demand in Portland is finally stabilizing and is positioning itself for a rebound in 2022. Barring any major setbacks from emerging variants, Portland might be heading back to a sense of normalcy in 2022.


The negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic continued to be felt deeply in the Portland metro office market. Demand for office space has continued to drop as a large segment of the workforce has shifted to a remote work model. Despite the drop in demand, year-over-year rent growth has returned with gains of 2.6%, while the national office rent gains are around 0.9%.


The rise in popularity of e-commerce and delivery services has greatly bolstered Portland’s industrial market during the COVID era. As a result, distribution and last-mile facilities will remain highly desired in the near- to mid-term. In order to combat supply chain issues that are impacting global markets, companies may look to shore up their domestic shipping assets. Several recent leases over 100,000 SF may be indicative of this trend.


Second quarter 2021 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 5.11%, an overall vacancy rate of 5.55%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $7.09 psf. In June, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 5.0%, a decrease of 16.2 percentage points compared to this time last year, while the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 5.9%, a decrease of 5.2 percentage points from one year ago. U.S. job openings surged to a record high as available positions escalated to 9.21M in May compared to April’s 9.19M. As the economy begins to rebound, social activity begins to grow, and more individuals become vaccinated U.S. employers are in high demand to fill a growing number of positions yet continue to face challenges. Many employers have begun offering incentives and increased wages to attract new employees and retain existing ones. Despite the 5% increase in the consumer price index over the past year, the largest increase since 2008, additional indicators and resources are pointing to an improving economy. Indicators include available job openings, an increase in travel, a spike in U.S. home construction that increased from 3.6% in May to 6.3% in June, and a growth in the manufacturing sector despite issues with the supply chain.


Second quarter 2021 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 19.90%, an overall vacancy rate of 21.46%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $18.52 psf. In June, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 5.0%, a decrease of 16.2 percentage points compared to this time last year, while the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 5.9%, a decrease of 5.2 percentage points from one year ago. U.S. job openings surged to a record high as available positions escalated to 9.21M in May compared to April’s 9.19M. As the economy begins to rebound, social activity begins to grow, and more individuals become vaccinated U.S. employers are in high demand to fill a growing number of positions yet continue to face challenges. Many employers have begun offering incentives and increased wages to attract new employees and retain existing ones. Despite the 5% increase in the consumer price index over the past year, the largest increase since 2008, additional indicators and resources are pointing to an improving economy. Indicators include available job openings, an increase in travel, a spike in U.S. home construction that increased from 3.6% in May to 6.3% in June, and a growth in the manufacturing sector despite issues with the supply chain.


Portland’s industrial market was better positioned than other markets to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. This is thanks to the growth of e-commerce and delivery services in the wake of the pandemic. While vacancy and rent growth have softened by mid-year 2021, they are still at healthy levels.


The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted several years of sustained growth in the Portland market. Demand for office space in the Portland metro area remains low, as businesses continue to evaluate their space needs in the post-pandemic era. The central business district (CBD) was hit hardest by the pandemic. Many smaller businesses have sought to move out of downtown into areas such as Beaverton and Gresham, however, several major office leases have still been signed in the CBD in 2021.Portland’s office investment market has also remained slow through 2021 as a result of the pandemic. Annual sales volume exceeded $1 billion between 2015 and 2019, but that came to an end in 2020.


The COVID-19 pandemic brought immense challenges to the retail sector, which had already been struggling for years due to the growth of e-commerce. 16 months of intermittent lock downs and social distancing caused many retailers and restaurants to close. With the state officially reopened as of June 30th, Portland’s retail market could bounce back in response.


First quarter 2021 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 19.46%, an overall vacancy rate of 20.76%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $18.51 psf. In March, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 5.1%, a decrease for the third straight month, yet still at an elevated rate compared to one year ago when recorded at 3.5%. While the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 6.0% in March, it continues to steadily decrease as the number of jobless claims dip as many job sectors continue to reopen. Optimism continues to grow as U.S. employers are expected to continue to add jobs as many states move towards easing business restrictions, creating confidence in paving a path toward strengthening the economic recovery in the coming months. Many other factors signal a strengthening economy including consumer spending, investing, and housing demand. Consumer spending increased at the fastest pace in 9-months and was recorded at 4.2% in March, while home prices in the U.S. increased by 11.9% in February, the fastest pace in close to 7- years as demand for housing continues to escalate. The Federal Reserve also announced they expect to keep the interest rate near zero with no rate hikes through 2023.


First quarter 2021 closed with a direct vacancy rate of 5.18%, an overall vacancy rate of 5.60%, and an average asking direct rental rate reported at $7.02 psf. In March, the Michigan unemployment rate was recorded at 5.1%, a decrease for the third straight month, yet still at an elevated rate compared to one year ago when recorded at 3.5%. While the U.S. unemployment rate was recorded at 6.0% in March, it continues to steadily decrease as the number of jobless claims dip as many job sectors continue to reopen. Optimism continues to grow as U.S. employers are expected to continue to add jobs as many states move towards easing business restrictions, creating confidence in paving a path toward strengthening the economic recovery in the coming months. Many other factors signal a strengthening economy including consumer spending, investing, and housing demand. Consumer spending increased at the fastest pace in nine months and was recorded at 4.2% in March, while U.S. home prices increased by 11.9% in February, the fastest pace in close to seven years as demand for housing continues to escalate. The Federal Reserve also announced they expect to keep the interest rate near zero with no rate hikes though 2023.


The tri-county area commercial market began the year trending positive with strong market fundamentals for all property types. Looking back at the quarter, and similarly to 2019 and 2020, the largest commercial sales in the market involved multi-family properties.


"The good news about 2020 is that the pandemic’s effect on the multifamily market doesn’t appear to be sustained, rather, more of a temporary pause."


2020 was a year for the ages. Election years are always uncertain, but this was the most contentious in recent history. Add to this a once in a century style global pandemic, a stock market crash, a recession, record job losses, civil unrest, and negative oil prices. It was a year that will be recalled for many decades to come. 2021 is welcomed with renewed optimism, some sense of clarity and stability, as well a light at the end of the Covid-19 pandemic in the form of a vaccine. In spite of all of the distractions, Texas continued to plod along, albeit at a slower pace than the previous year.


Investors continued to demonstrate interest and confidence in the Edmonton market.


Vacancy in Calgary’s Downtown remained relatively steady over the third quarter of 2017, rising by 0.4% to 25%. Q3 proved quiet in comparison to the preceding 11 quarters, posting negative net absorption totaling Downtown Market Beltline Market 193,000 square feet (sf).


Investors continued to demonstrate confidence in the Calgary market through the third quarter of 2017.


The end of the third quarter brings healthy activity from both the sales and leasing market throughout the Calgary area.


AT THE MID-POINT OF 2017, THE EDMONTON MARKET POSTED A FOURTH CONSECUTIVE QUARTER OF RENEWED APPEAL TO COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE (CRE) INVESTORS. AS A BONUS, 2017 IS WIDELY CONSIDERED THE YEAR ALBERTA WILL SEE ITS ECONOMY ENTER A RECOVERY STAGE. THE SENSE OF OPTIMISM THAT SET IN DURING THE LATTER PORTION OF 2016 CONTINUED AND WAS MANIFEST IN THE MORE THAN $1.08 BILLION BEING INVESTED IN COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES FROM JANUARY THROUGH JUNE.


DURING THE FIRST HALF OF 2017, RAYS OF LIGHT CONTINUED BREAKING THROUGH THE CLOUDS CAST BY A NEARLY THREE-YEAR LONG RECESSION. THOUGH THE ALBERTA ECONOMY GENERALLY CONTINUED MOVING AT A SLOWED PACE, A FEW KEY SECTORS EXPANDED AND SEVERAL LARGE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS MAINTAINED THEIR FORECASTS OF AN OVERALL RECOVERY THIS YEAR.


CALGARY’S SUBURBAN MARKETS EXPERIENCED AN INTERESTING SECOND QUARTER AS SEVERAL NEW OFFICE DEVELOPMENTS WERE DELIVERED.


VACANCY IN CALGARY’S DOWNTOWN REMAINED RELATIVELY STEADY AT MID-YEAR 2017, RISING BY 0.4% TO 24.6%.


Vacancy dropped to 3% following four consecutive quarters in the mid-3% range. This marks a return to Q1 2016 levels.


Investors continued to demonstrate confidence in the Calgary market through the first quarter of 2017.


At the end of the first trimester of 2017, the industrial market of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City recorded an inventory of 8.8M Sq.M of industrial ships class A, mainly in the submarkets of Cuautitlan (32%) and Toluca (20%).


The first trimester of the year closed with a total office inventory of 5.8 million Sq.M in class A+ and A offices. This means an increase of 339 thousand Sq.M.


Interesting things happened in the Downtown market over the first three months of the year; notably in leasing trends at the smallest end of available options.


A pleasant surprise! While expectations were that CRE investment in the Edmonton market would decline, we have seen strong overall demand and spending, particularly on Retail properties over the course of 2016, shifting from ICI Land the previous year. The remaining asset classes largely remained stable and generally exceeded analysts’ expectations.


The entrance of institutional investors in the Calgary market, during a down period, demonstrates a renewed confidence in the future of the city. Adding additional appeal is the advanced process of industry diversification. The results of 2016 are of no surprise to prudent investors and to us Calgarians.


THE BELTLINE MARKET WITNESSED NET POSITIVE ABSORPTION DURING THE FOURTH QUARTER OF 2016, TOTALLING 135,000 SQUARE FEET (SF).


THE OVERALL VACANCY RATE IN SUBURBAN CALGARY WAS ESSENTIALLY FLAT DURING THE FOURTH QUARTER, RISING A FRACTION OF A PERCENT TO 22.6% FROM 22.3% IN Q3 2016.


Over the course of 2016, 2.5 million square feet (msf) of office space was returned to the market, causing the vacancy rate in downtown Calgary to increase by 6.2% year-over-year from Q4 2015. Downtown vacancy sat at 23.5%, representing 9.8 msf of space available for lease within a 41.6 msf inventory. Despite renewed activity among A Class and B Class headlease spaces, the overall trend of negative absorption continued, though as a slowed pace when compared to 2015 and early 2016. It should be noted that 3.9 msf were vacated during the previous year.


The ongoing economic downturn continued to exert pressure on Landlords and Tenants, leading to several store and restaurant closures. Therein, however, lay opportunity for others to take advantage of decreasing market rental rates, which led to the opening of multiple new franchise locations.


Investor sentiment regarding the Calgary market showed signs of renewed confidence as 2016 progressed.


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Eastern Edition, 1st Quarter 2016 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Eastern States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Eastern Edition, 4th Quarter 2015 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Eastern States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Eastern Edition, 3rd Quarter 2015 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Eastern States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


"As we enter the second half of 2015 we see markets which are continuing to trend towards favorable levels. Buyers are beginning to respond to the Federal Reserve’s hint of an interest rate increase later this September. We see a pronounced increase in the acquisition market and anticipate this activity will continue going forward into 2016."


"Second quarter 2015 continues an ongoing positive trend ... our seventeenth straight quarter of positive absorption."


2015 Q2 | STREET SMARTS (MHP, NYC)

Research and analysis by Hugh Kelly


"The good news about 2020 is that the pandemic’s effect on the multifamily market doesn’t appear to be sustained, rather, more of a temporary pause."


2020 was a year for the ages. Election years are always uncertain, but this was the most contentious in recent history. Add to this a once in a century style global pandemic, a stock market crash, a recession, record job losses, civil unrest, and negative oil prices. It was a year that will be recalled for many decades to come. 2021 is welcomed with renewed optimism, some sense of clarity and stability, as well a light at the end of the Covid-19 pandemic in the form of a vaccine. In spite of all of the distractions, Texas continued to plod along, albeit at a slower pace than the previous year.


2020 was a year for the ages. Election years are always uncertain, but this was the most contentious in recent history. Add to this a once in a century style global pandemic, a stock market crash, a recession, record job losses, civil unrest, and negative oil prices. It was a year that will be recalled for many decades to come. 2021 is welcomed with renewed optimism, some sense of clarity and stability, as well a light at the end of the Covid-19 pandemic in the form of a vaccine. In spite of all of the distractions, Texas continued to plod along, albeit at a slower pace than the previous year.


"2021 will be the year of retail recovery, but it will be a very uneven, choppy recovery."


"2020 is a year that will long be remembered as one of significant upheaval and uncertainty and the Oklahoma City office market was certainly not immune to that."


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, retail sales during May 2020 were up 17.7% seasonally adjusted from the prior month but down 6.1% year-over-year. That follows a record-setting 14.7% drop in April 2020 (month-over-month).


The last 12 months have been marked by dramatic changes. As of this writing, these events have not seriously affected the Oklahoma City multi-tenant industrial market. Overall, multi-tenant industrial properties have continued the declining vacancy trend seen over the past two years. The bulkwarehouse sector is the exception this year.


During the first half of 2020 the market vacancy rate rose from 20.9% to 23.5% in the first half of 2020. The rise in vacancies has been market-wide with the Central Business District vacancy rate rising from 21.8% to 23.6% and the suburban submarkets rising from 20.8% to 23.4% vacant. Market-wide rental rates showed a slight dip from $19.53 per square foot to $19.45 per square foot. The market experienced negative absorption of nearly 536,000 square feet which was market-wide in nature rather than limited to one or two submarkets. The CBD experienced negative absorption of 146,000 SF and the suburban submarkets totaled nearly 390,000 SF of negative absorption.


Three quarters of the way through the year, 2019 has been better than expected. DFW growth has continued to increase. DFW still struggles to find labor, and that is the biggest strain on the economy at the present time. There is a true war for talent, and we continue to monitor this closely. Trade tariffs and slowed oil & gas activity continue to be a concern; however, there is enormous interest from coastal markets on the relocation & investment fronts from (New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco). The economy continues to grow, and we feel the fundamentals for Dallas-Fort Worth are positive and the 4th quarter of 2019 will be exceptional.


Three quarters of the way through the year, 2019 has been better than expected. DFW growth has continued to increase. DFW still struggles to find labor, and that is the biggest strain on the economy at the present time. There is a true war for talent, and we continue to monitor this closely. Trade tariffs and slowed oil & gas activity continue to be a concern; however, there is enormous interest from coastal markets on the relocation front and the investment from (New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco), the economy continues to grow, and we feel the fundamentals for Dallas-Fort Worth continue to be positive and the 4th quarter of 2019 is expected to be exceptional.


The first half of 2019 showed little change in the Oklahoma City office market, but what change occurred was fairly positive.   Vacancies fell from 20.1% to 19.3% and absorption of space totaled 128,000 square feet.


Oklahoma City real estate is known for its relative stability and slow but steady growth.  We typically don’t see the cyclical volatility nor the overexuberance of other markets.  The numbers for the first half of the year reflect this even as retail nationally and locally is undergoing transformational change.


Current multi-tenant industrial vacancy for the Oklahoma City metro area now stands at 16.96%, down from 20.31% in mid-year 2018. These swings seem to be the new normal – multi-year strong absorption and rent growth periods followed by multi-year double-digit vacancy and relative quiescence (a kinder term to use around your developer friends than “stagnation”), culminating in eight to ten-year cycles overall.


The second quarter of 2019 continues to show that the market favors the landlord. Vacancy rates held steady in Q2, while asking rents rose from $7.09 in the first quarter, to $7.17 in Q2.


Overall market occupancy equaled 92 percent at year-end 2018, unchanged from a year ago. This confirms that there has been little overall movement in the aggregate market but belies all the activity behind the numbers. The underlying fact is that retail continues to grow, both nationally and locally. We added 650,000 square feet of space in centers over 25,000 square feet this past year, maintained occupancy, and, for the most part, rents. Much of the pain of the last few years is over – store closings have declined, downsizing is still taking place but at a reasonable rate, and retail layoffs have leveled off.


The first half of 2018 brought expected results for the Oklahoma City Central Business District with increased vacancy due to the addition of the BOK Park Plaza Building to available inventory and negative absorption of 84,000 square feet. However, there are continued signs of improvement in the suburbs as 157,000 square feet was absorbed in those submarkets. The net absorption for the entire market was a positive 73,000 square feet; the first positive absorption total in the past seven semi-annual reports.


The past twelve months have seen a rise in multi-tenant industrial vacancy from 17.63% in 2017 to 20.13% in 2018.


The second quarter saw a slight increase in vacancy from 6.3% in Q1, to 6.4% in Q2, indicating that the market continues to move forward at a healthy pace.


Bradford Allen is pleased to share with you our 2018 first quarter office market report.This quarter in the downtown market:• Office market activity in River West is officially tracked as the most recent submarket to join the CBD. • Net absorption was positive 720,640 sf. • The direct vacancy rate dropped to 11.85% from 12.1%, and the average gross asking rent decreased to $39.38psf from $40.69psf, both compared to the previous quarter.


Vacancy for Q1/2018 remains at 6.3% and rates were largely unchanged for industrial, with a slight increase from $5.88 SF in Q4/2017 up to $5.92 SF at the end of the first quarter. Demand continues to outweigh supply and the majority of submarkets continue to experience low vacancy rates.


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 2nd Quarter 2017 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCN Worldwide. In this edition: –National and Macroeconomic Overview –Regional Economic Conditions –Commercial Property Investment Trends


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 1st Quarter 2017 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCN Worldwide In this edition: –National and Macroeconomic Overview –Regional Economic Conditions –Commercial Property Investment Trends


The Denver retail vacancy rate decreased in the fourth quarter, ending the year at 4.6%. Overall, the retail market has seen a decrease in vacancy rate, with the vacancy rate starting at 4.9% in Q1 2016, to 4.8% in the end of Q2 2016, remaining 4.8% at the end of Q3 2016, down to 4.6% in Q4 2016.


The Denver industrial vacancy rate slightly increased in the fourth quarter, ending the year at 4.8%. Specifically, both industrial-flex projects and warehouse projects experienced an increase in vacancy over the last quarter but slightly fluctuated throughout all four quarters.


The Denver office market ended the year with a vacancy rate of 9.8%. The market continued its upward climb in vacancy for the second consecutive quarter after six quarters that consistently posted a decrease.


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 4th Quarter 2016 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCN Worldwide In this edition: –National and Macroeconomic Overview –Regional Conditions in the Central States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


The Denver office market experience an upward tick in vacancy for the first time in 6 quarters during the third quarter of 2016. CoStar reported the third quarter vacancy rate at 9.6%. It was also reported that rental rates decreased slightly to $24.94 in Q3 2016 from a reported $25.11 the previous quarter. Net absorption for the overall Denver office market was a negative (29,698) comparing to a positive 754,222 square feet at the end of Q2, and a positive 722,380 square feet in Q1 2016.


The overall Denver industrial vacancy rate ended the third quarter at 4.5%, remaining exactly the same as the previous quarter. More specifically, both industrial-flex projects and warehouse projects experienced a slight increase in vacancy over the last quarter. Vacant sublease space increased dramatically, to 987,082 square feet from 618,165 square feet the previous quarter. Currently there are 4,559,050 square feet of industrial buildings under construction, having had a total of 8 buildings delivered to the market totaling 616,142 square feet during Q3 2016.


The Denver retail market did not experience much change in the third quarter compared to the previous quarter. There was positive absorption of 414,201 square feet from a positive 528,879 square feet in the second quarter 2016. Vacancy rates remained steady at 4.7% quarter-over-quarter.


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 3rd Quarter 2016 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCN Worldwide In this edition: –National and Macroeconomic Overview –Regional Conditions in the Western States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 2nd Quarter 2016 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCN WorldwideIn this edition: –National and Macroeconomic Overview –Regional Conditions in the Western States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


As we enter the fifth year of the latest "tech boom," there are some pretty compelling signs that the "party is almost over."


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 1st Quarter 2016 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE, Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Western States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


Stark & Associates Retail Market Newsletter for the Northern Nevada Market. Local experts are bullish on Nevada...


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 3rd Quarter 2015 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Western States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


TCN Worldwide's State of the Market: Western Edition, 3rd Quarter 2015 Prepared by Hugh F. Kelly, PhD, CRE Consulting Economist to TCNIn this edition: –Overview of National Economic Context –Regional Conditions in the Western States –Commercial Property Investment Trends


The Scottsdale Office market ended the second quarter 2015 with a vacancy rate of 15.8%, which was slightly lower over the previous quarter. Net absorption totaled positive 42,390 square feet and rental rates ended the second quarter at $23.29, an increase over the previous quarter. No buildings were delivered, but 239,189 square feet are still under construction at the end of the quarter.


The Scottsdale retail market experienced a slight improvement in market conditions in the second quarter 2015. The vacancy rate went from 7.3% in the previous quarter to 7.5% in the current quarter. Net absorption was negative (38,078) square feet, thus creating an increase in vacant space. Quoted rental rates increased from first quarter levels, ending the second quarter at $20.24 per square foot per year. No buildings were delivered in the second quarter but 172,689 square feet are still under construction at the end of the quarter.


The Scottsdale Industrial (Northeast Ind) submarket ended the second quarter 2015 with a vacancy rate of 9.5%. The vacancy rate increased since the previous quarter, with net absorption totaling a negative 35,131 square feet in the second quarter. Vacant sublease space also increased in the quarter and rental rates ended at $11.32, an increase over the previous quarter.


A Complete Analysis of Denver Metro & Surrounding MarketsNumbers - Locations Vacancies - Rates